Elections News Archive

Secretary of State Tre Hargett would like to congratulate three administrators of elections who passed the state certification exam Tuesday, May 2, 2017.
Secretary of State Tre Hargett would like to congratulate three administrators of elections who passed the state certification exam Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016.
Tennessee’s presidential electors met at the State Capitol Monday to cast their ballots for president of the United States. The Volunteer State has 11 of the total 538 electoral votes that make up the U.S. Electoral College.
Official election results from the Nov. 8, 2016, general election are now available. Secretary of State Tre Hargett, Gov. Bill Haslam and Attorney General Herbert Slatery certified Nov. 8 election results with Coordinator of Elections Mark Goins Dec. 13.
The Division of Elections would like to remind Tennesseans how to make voting in the Nov. 8 general election go as smoothly as possible. Many voters are expected Tuesday even after a record-breaking 1,675,679 people voted early in person or by mail ahead of Election Day.
Tennesseans showed up in strong numbers to vote early for the Nov. 8 general election. A record-breaking 1,675,679 people voted early or cast absentee ballots across the Volunteer State's 95 counties from Oct. 19 through Nov. 3.
Early voting for the Nov. 8 general election is now underway. Secretary of State Tre Hargett and Coordinator of Elections Mark Goins are encouraging Tennesseans to take advantage of this opportunity to avoid lines on Election Day.
Time is running out to get registered to vote. The deadline to register to vote in the November general election is Tuesday, Oct. 11.
Secretary of State Tre Hargett is urging Tennesseans to use #GoVoteTN on social media as a way to encourage others to register to vote.
This fall students across Tennessee will be able to do something most kids can't: vote for president of the United States.
The Division of Elections would like to remind Tennesseans how to make voting in the August 4 state primary and county general election go as smoothly as possible. 281,269 voters cast early or absentee ballots ahead of Election Day.
Tennesseans are showing up to vote early in the August 4 state primary and county general election. So far a total of 124,433 voters have voted early or cast absentee ballots.
Early voting for the August 4 state primary and county general election is now underway. Voting will continue Mondays through Saturdays and end Saturday, July 30.
Tennesseans are two steps closer to being able to register to vote online. This morning the House passed HB1742. This comes on the heels of the Senate unanimously passing SB1626 on Monday.
Tennessee Coordinator of Elections Mark Goins was recently elected to serve as chairman of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) Standards Board. His term begins on April 29 and will last one year.
The Division of Elections reports a record number of Tennesseans voted in the March 1 presidential preference primary or "SEC Primary." A record-breaking 1,240,178 Tennesseans voted to decide who could be the next president of the United States.
The Division of Elections would like to remind Tennesseans how to make voting in the March 1 presidential preference primary, or "SEC Primary," go as smoothly as possible.
A record number of Tennesseans chose to vote early for the March 1 presidential preference primary, or "SEC Primary," when six other Southern states will join Tennessee to decide who could be the next president of the United States.
Tennesseans planning to vote early in the March 1 presidential preference primary, or "SEC Primary," need to visit their polling locations by Tuesday, February 23.
The Division of Elections would like to remind Tennesseans planning to vote early in the March 1 presidential preference primary, or "SEC Primary," that tomorrow, Saturday, February 20, is the last weekend opportunity to cast an early ballot.
This election cycle voting early may be an important option because of unpredictable winter weather. The number of presidential candidates as well as the number of delegates could also create incredibly long ballots for some voters.
In 2016, Tennessee will play a bigger role than ever before in deciding who will be the next president of the United States.
Tennesseans who want to vote in the March 1 presidential preference primary, or “SEC Primary,” must register to vote by Monday, February 1, 2016.
The Tennessee Highway Officials Certification Board will continue reviewing candidates for the August election beginning on Thursday, January 21.

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