Tennessee’s State Constitutions on Display for Statehood Day

Wednesday, May 19, 2021

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Tennessee State Library and Archives is celebrating 225 years of statehood on June 1, 2021, with a one-day-only public display of Tennessee’s three original constitutions.

The state's constitutions, first written in 1796 and revised in 1834 and 1870, will all be on display in the lobby of the new Library and Archives building located at 1001 Rep. John Lewis Way N. on the northeast corner of the Bicentennial Mall State Park in Nashville on Tuesday, June 1 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CDT.

In addition to viewing these priceless documents, which the Tennessee Highway Patrol Honor Guard will safeguard, guests can explore the interactive exhibits in the Library and Archives lobby and take a tour of the new building. Library and Archives staff will give tours every half hour from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

“Tennessee’s three constitutions are the foundation of our state government,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “I encourage my fellow Tennesseans not to miss this opportunity to make history come alive by seeing these irreplaceable documents up close."

The Library and Archives, a division of the Department of State, is responsible for collecting and preserving books and records of historical, documentary and reference value, focusing on items related to Tennessee. Tennessee’s constitutions are the highest valued and most historically significant items in the collection.

“The Library and Archives strives to be a resource for researchers, historians, librarians, archivists, genealogists, lawyers, students and anyone interested in Tennessee history,” said Chuck Sherrill, Tennessee State Librarian and Archivist. “Our staff is excited to welcome visitors to our new building and to share our state’s three constitutions and other interactive exhibits."

The Library and Archives is joining Bicentennial Mall State Park and the Tennessee State Museum for a variety of events to celebrate Tennessee’s 225th Statehood Day.

Bicentennial Mall State Park is celebrating Statehood Day and its 25th anniversary on June 1 with a special event at 10 a.m. in the Amphitheater followed by guided tours and educational programs led by park rangers. For more information about the 25th-anniversary celebration, visit tnstateparks.info/BiMall25thAnn.

To celebrate Tennessee’s Statehood, the Tennessee State Museum launched Tennessee at 225: Highlights from the Collection, a self-guided tour and online exhibition showcasing artifacts that tell a story about Tennessee, from its First Peoples to the present day. Learn more at tnmuseum.org/TN225.

The Statehood Day events at the Library and Archives, Bicentennial Mall State Park and the Tennessee State Museum are free. Reservations are not required.

For the latest information from the Library and Archives, follow their social media channels: Facebook: Tennessee State Library and Archives and Instagram: @tnlibarchives and the Secretary of State's Twitter account: @SecTreHargett.

For more information about the Library and Archives and the other divisions of the Department of State, visit sos.tn.gov.

About the Tennessee State Library and Archives
The office of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett oversees the operations of the Tennessee State Library and Archives. By law, it is required to preserve Tennessee's legal and civic history by housing the archives of state government and records from families, churches, businesses and organizations. The Library and Archives is home to several notable historical documents, including Tennessee's Constitutions, letters from Tennessee's three presidents, Civil War diaries, records of 55 past Governors of the State, maps and original records of the State of Franklin. The collections include copies of virtually every book published about Tennessee and Tennesseans. The Library and Archives preserve original documents from court cases and legislation, along with audio recordings of legislative proceedings since 1955. Records from every Tennessee courthouse and all surviving Tennessee newspapers can also be viewed in the library's collections.