Resource Guide

This page contains information and services for local public libraries throughout the state.
The American Civil War that shattered families and tore the nation asunder has continued to capture the imagination of generations and to fascinate researchers. Tracing Civil War ancestors has been of particular interest to Tennesseans; therefore, it is hard to envision a time when this type of research wasn’t possible. This resource guide lists books, microfilm, and manuscript resources and represents some of the vast collection of materials that the Tennessee State Library and Archives has amassed which makes tracking Civil War soldiers and citizens possible.
The Tennessee State Library and Archives houses a rich and varied collection of original, commercially published, and microfilmed legal and legislative documents. This material can be of use to legal historians and scholars, as well as to those individuals seeking information about current Tennessee legislation and laws. Listed on this web site are some of the most frequently requested items.
In this installment of the Tennessee State Library and Archives free workshop series, the Honorable Judge Andy D. Bennett of the Tennessee Court of Appeals will present the history of each of Tennessee’s constitutions. Learn details about the historical documents and what they meant for Tennesseans during that time in history.
The Civil War has touched the life of almost every U.S. citizen but connecting families with complete records can present challenges. Presenter J. Mark Lowe demonstrates how to search and use the wide variety of records available through the Tennessee State Library and Archives to draw a more complete picture of their Civil War ancestor and family history.
Explore record groups as well as printed and digital election-related materials such as newspapers.
In this installment of the Tennessee State Library and Archives free workshop series, Assistant State Archivist Dr. Wayne Moore shares the stories of those who labored on the Capitol, from the unpaid prisoners to William Strickland himself, from 19th century African American stonecutters and Irish masons to the 21st century Rock City crews. These and other new facts about the Capitol emerge from the wealth of records at the State Library and Archives.
Presenter Melissa Barker is a certified archives manager for the Houston County Archives and a professional genealogist who works with clients researching their Tennessee ancestors. Barker discusses the importance of visiting an archive when seeking out records that are not online.
In this installment of the Tennessee State Library and Archives free workshop series, local author Bill Carey examines slavery through slavery ads appearing in Tennessee newspapers. Carey researched every newspaper printed in Tennessee from 1791 until 1864, including newspapers on microfilm held at The Tennessee State Library and Archives.
Digital Materials Librarian Jennifer Randles will take attendees on a tour of the newly-redesigned Tennessee Virtual Archive (TeVA). The free online repository of Tennessee’s history contains valuable collections, such as photographs, documents, maps, postcards, audio, and video. Learn how to quickly find what you need in TeVA’s collections and view some of the many items available via the website.
In this installment of the Tennessee State Library and Archives free workshop series, genealogist Taneya Koonce will navigate attendees through the benefits of using newspapers when putting together the puzzle pieces in genealogical and historical research.
Genealogy is the record of a family’s history. In many cases, our ancestors left a “paper trail” for us to follow. Genealogy is a very personal way to study history which can lead to many exciting discoveries. This guide tells you how to begin, how to make use of records, information about birth and death records, county records, state records, military records, city directories and phone books, and newspapers.
The following Resource Guide has list of book, microfilm, and manuscript resources represents some of the vast collection of materials that the Tennessee State Library and Archives has amassed which makes tracking World War I soldiers and citizens possible.
World War II was the greatest armed conflict in history, and Tennessee played a significant role in the Allied victory. Over 300,000 men from all parts of the state served in America’s armed forces and six were decorated with the nation’s highest award for valor, the Congressional Medal of Honor. The materials cited in this guide are only a sampling. Please consult with reference staff for additional materials.
A set of frequently asked questions about the Tennessee State Library and Archives.
The purpose of the following resource guides is to help identify and clarify some of the vast resources available at Tennessee State Library and Archives. These guides are not comprehensive listings for all archival collections, but rather a sampling of what is available to interested researchers.
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