Library & Archives News Archive

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett, along with Gov. Bill Haslam, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally (R-Oak Ridge), Speaker Beth Harwell (R-Nashville) and Tennessee State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill, officially broke ground on the new home of the Tennessee State Library and Archives Monday.
The Tennessee State Library and Archives is proud to recognize 11 new graduates of the Tennessee Archives Institute. The archives development program annually hosts this two-and-a-half day series of workshops on the principles and practices of archival management and records preservation.
Thanksgiving is a time when many of us reconnect with family members and share stories. At the Tennessee State Library and Archives, families can also explore stories of their relatives who lived generations ago.
The Linebaugh Public Library System is receiving a $100,000 Library Construction Grant from the Tennessee State Library and Archives to create a new Technology Engagement Center, the first of its kind in the state of Tennessee.
Over a five-year period, World War I ravaged Europe, the Middle East and parts of North Africa, overturning governments and costing millions of lives.
The Tennessee Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (TLBPH), a division of the Tennessee State Library and Archives, has a new online ordering system offering unprecedented access to patrons. The system is available 24/7 and can be easily accessed on a computer or mobile device.
The Johnson County Public Library is receiving a $100,000 Library Construction Grant from the Tennessee State Library and Archives to expand its current facility.
In partnership with the Tennessee Arts Commission, the Tennessee State Library and Archives will host a free event about “folklife” Oct. 14. Folklife is a multifaceted tradition which values oral stories, songs, art and many other cultural aspects.
Locating the land of an ancestor can uncover a wealth of knowledge. On Sept. 23, the Tennessee State Library and Archives will host a free workshop about land platting.
Photographs are a critical part of learning and understanding history. On July 22, the Tennessee State Library and Archives will host a free workshop entitled “From Farm Boy to Tomahawk Warrior: David Franklin Brock Korean War Photograph Collection."
Five Tennessee students received medals last week during the 2017 National History Day Contest. In all, 58 middle and high school students represented Tennessee in the competition, where students prepare documentaries, exhibits, papers, performances and websites with historical themes.
The Tennessee State Library and Archives is awarding more than $337,000 in library technology training grants to 45 public libraries across the state.
When Tennessee became a state June 1, 1796, only about 77,000 people lived here. Tennessee was the country's 16th state and the first to be created from territory that had been under federal jurisdiction.
Documents made with pen and paper aren't the only important records of Tennessee history. In some cases, the stories of the state's early days are stitched together in embroidered cloth patches known as samplers.
He was the first Tennessean to serve as president of the United States – and his legacy remains hotly debated to this day. Andrew Jackson was a larger-than-life figure in American politics, a war hero who rode a wave of populism into the White House.
Seventy-three students qualified to represent Tennessee at National History Day later this summer. Those students placed first or second in their categories at Tennessee History Day held in Nashville on Saturday.
Following months of research and competitions at the local and district levels, more than 300 students from across the state will present their projects at the annual Tennessee History Day competition in downtown Nashville Saturday.
Story time is a popular tradition at public libraries throughout the country, but story time events at the Tennessee State Library and Archives have a special twist: instead of performing with groups of eager children crowded at her feet, the librarian administering the program at the Library and Ar
The United States’ entry into World War I led to tragedy for the West family from the East Tennessee community of Oliver Springs.
As the legislative session winds down, I am cautiously optimistic that the General Assembly will include funding for a new Tennessee State Library and Archives building in the next state budget.
Over a five-year period, World War I ravaged Europe, the Middle East and parts of North Africa, overturning governments and costing millions of lives. The United States joined the battle on April 6, 1917, eventually mobilizing 130,000 soldiers from Tennessee.
Born 250 years ago this month, Andrew Jackson remains one of Tennessee's most iconic and controversial political figures.
Sen. Douglas Henry was one of the most distinguished as well as the longest serving member of Tennessee General Assembly. There was simply no one else like him.
Representatives from seven West Tennessee counties gathered in Martin Feb. 13 to discuss a range of issues affecting the state’s public libraries. The event was organized by the Obion River Regional Library, which is part of the Tennessee State Library and Archives.

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